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The Marketers’ Bill of Rights

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OPINIONS. TRENDS. MEDIA ISSUES.

                                             

Volume 16, Issue 8

Marketers’ Bill of Rights

 
Why We Developed a Marketer’s Bill of Rights
 
by David L Smith and John Cate
 

As has been well reported, the advertising industry was rocked in late 2015 by allegations of improper actions being taken with advertiser dollars, especially (but not limited to) the media investments being handled by large multi-national/holding companies. 

This past June an investigation commissioned by the American Association of National Advertisers (ANA) validated much of what was a primary concern: agencies were not being fully transparent about the ways they were making money.

We’ve taken note of this.

As an independent media agency that has always aspired to the best practices in transparency (both relative to costs and data), we felt it was time to be clearly and publicly committed to a set of principles. Last month we issued a Client Bill of Rights as a set of promises to our current clients, and as an offering to prospective clients.  We shared the document as well with our friends and colleagues in the industry, and have been overwhelmed by the positive response.

While many in the industry are already running their businesses in the spirit of these principles, the K9 report from the ANA and subsequent Ebiquity best practice recommendations have made it increasingly apparent to us that not all in our industry are willing to run their companies in a fully transparent way. Even the 4A’s guidelines on transparency issued this year have a certain opaqueness to them. So while our Client Bill of Rights still stands in its purpose, we have decided to develop a companion Marketer Bill of Rights. 

This outward pivot of our client-facing set of principles is intended to be a helpful starting point for marketers and agencies in thinking about how they can define their relationships.

From the start of this effort, we have been clear that issues of transparency in cost and data in our industry are not easily solved. We are also not casting any specific allegations at any particular entity.  We’re only being very clear about how we do business and how many other transparent mid-major agencies do business too.

Our Marketer’s Bill of Rights are found here on our site, and are also listed below in this Anvil. We think this is an important time in our industry for all “agencies” to clearly define our businesses.

We thank Business Insider for their coverage of this effort in their October 6 issue.

Mediasmith Morsel

Bottom Line: What does the ANA/Ebiquity report say?

After reviewing the extensive content of the ANA/Ebiquity Report, Mike Drexler wrote an excellent article on “What the ANA Transparecy Report Really Tells US”. We thought you might find it helpful to review. Mike’s article first appeared July 28 in a Thought Leadership for Executives blog post on Media Village.

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Mediasmith is a transparent and full disclosure media agency.  We believe all Marketers have the following rights:
 
I.   Marketers have the right to unbiased media recommendations that are not influenced by their agency’s seller relationships.
Marketers come to agencies for their experience and media relationships but should expect agencies to view the media landscape objectively, and to provide media recommendations that are intended to build the marketer’s business, not the media sellers.
 
II.  Marketers have the right to expect agencies to be their buying agents, acting only in their best interests.
This is why agencies are called agencies, and where some are blurring their roles.
 
III. Marketers have the right to know that their buying agency does not also own or sell media.
No agency can own media and sell it without a conflict of interest.
 
IV. Marketers have the right to itemized invoices, including separation of agency fee from seller costs.
Marketers should know exactly what’s being paid for each component of media, and even be provided the actual seller invoices if wanted.  This is what’s really meant by transparency.
 
V.  Marketers Have the right to see all of their media performance data, and to know where all of their advertising runs.
Performance and insights are generated by the marketer’s investments. At minimum, they have the right to see all of the data generated from their campaigns. 
 
VI. Marketers have the right to receive and pay their own media invoices.
Most agencies plan to do vendor payment for their clients as a service, but with nothing to hide, they should gladly volunteer this option.
 
VII. Marketers have the right to own any rebates, discounts, or media value generated by their investments.
It’s the marketer’s money that earns this value, and they own it. Agencies should take their client’s lead on what to do with that money.
 
VIII. Marketers have the right to know all media technology costs.
Media technology costs should be just as transparent as media costs.
 
IX.  Marketers have the right to formally audit their agency’s finances as related to their media buys.
Agencies should welcome whatever their clients require to ensure trust. 
 
X.   Marketers have the right to know if their agency is subcontracting work and to whom.
Marketers should have the confidence that only agency employees or disclosed partners will be handling their money. The use of undisclosed sister company relationships and other outsourcing does not encourage transparency.
 
 
David L. Smith is CEO and Founder of Mediasmith. John Cate is President and COO of Mediasmith. 
 
 
Mediasmith Morsel

Data Ownership not Clear to Clients

While the ANA/Ebiquity report recommended advertiser data ownership relative to campaigns, it may not be practical to achieve right now. Our article, which ran in Digiday explores the issue.

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What’s the Story with VR and AR?

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OPINIONS. TRENDS. MEDIA ISSUES.

Welcome to Mediasmith’s influential and widely
respected newsletter

Volume 16, Issue 5

What’s the Story with VR and AR?

by David Smith

(First published on MediaVillage) With the release of Oculus Rift, virtual reality is really here. What does this mean, and what’s the difference between virtual reality and augmented reality?

If there is one thing we’ve learned from the Convergence Culture, it is that virtually reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) may someday be contained in the same headset. For now though, they are separate and they will always be very different. In fact, VR should not be confused with AR even though it is. So, a few words of explanation for those who do not understand (as I did not until recently).

VR is the total disruption of personal reality; a new reality is instead created through computer generated or translated images inside of a headset (think movies and videogames). AR maintains the users’ actual reality while overlaying or superimposing information about what the user is seeing (e.g., the first iteration of Google Glass). A simple comparison: VR is being inside of something else with no visibility as to your actual reality or surroundings while AR is viewing things in the real world, with information about objects overlaid. AR will have to interact and communicate with your surroundings, while with VR you could walk off a cliff without knowing.

If you’ve been following the VR developments captivating the country, then you know that big players are getting involved. Facebook with its purchase of Oculus Rift for $2 billion in 2014 sparked excitement for the next-generation of VR. The first Oculus Rift releases are now in the hands of consumers. (If you want to buy one now, figure on a minimum 3-month lead-time). Companies like Samsung, Apple, HTC Vive, Microsoft and PlayStation are also following suit with their own acquisitions and creations, not to mention all of the startups joining the field. The latest addition to the game is Intel with their investment already in the $300-500 million range.

Mediasmith Morsel

Want to know what’s really going on with digital media?

Terry Kawaja presented his “State of Digital Media” at DMS16. The report includes Ecosystem Considerations, Market Update and Significant Industry Trends.
Read More

You can expect VR technology first to change our experiences with video games and movies; these devices are already on their way to a retailer or theater near you. However, like a lot of new tech, you should figure out a way to experiment with rather than buy one of these doodads. It seems clear from this vantage point that we’ll have to get to V 3.0 or so before this tech is fully ready. For prime time consumption, the video application of VR (like Facebook’s 360 view) is the slice that will need to grow if there is going to be a mainstream application.

As far as AR goes, you probably remember Google Glass. Some called it a debacle but in fact it was just an early version of what AR could be. Like V 1.0 of any tech, it was a flawed product and more of a beta than an actual release. If you saw this year’s Super Bowl ad for Microsoft’s HoloLens then you can easily see the draw of AR. Full AR capabilities are still a long ways off though. Not only will the technologies within the device need to get better, but so will the technologies in your environment. Remember, AR needs to be able to interact with your surroundings.

From GPS mastering your location in dense urban environments to sensor and signal identification, AR’s success depends on a relay of information. This information onboarding process hasn’t yet been fully realized or implemented. Eventually though, whether it is identifying items in stores, such as what’s on sale or what’s new, or understanding the ingredients and materials in something without actually picking it up, AR will soon accompany us in our exploration of the world. Just like with search engines, the next generation of consumers will not be able to imagine a world without AR.

Past all of their hype and potential, one thing is for sure, VR and AR applications are definitely closer to being a “reality” this time around instead of the word only existing in their name. I’ll give them a shot. Will you?

Mediasmith Morsel

Mediasmith Included in First Ever Agency LUMAscape

Mediasmith is proud to be featured as one of only four independent media agencies on a new LUMAscape dedicated to the Agency sector. This is the first in a new series of “Foundational” LUMAscapes that will be emerging in 2016, and is Mediasmith’s 3rd LUMAscape appearance.
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You can have my car when you pull the gearshift from my cold, dead hands

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OPINIONS. TRENDS. MEDIA ISSUES.

Welcome to Mediasmith’s influential and widely
respected newsletter

Volume 16, Issue 3

You can have my car when you pull the gearshift from my cold, dead hands

by David Smith

(First published on MediaVillage) It is a sunny October morning; I’m heading to work in my new AV (automated vehicle); my favorite song is streaming through speakers placed in optimal positions around the cabin; my dashboard’s 30-inch translucent screen is updating my schedule while I clear appointments, make dinner reservations, and check out the latest Netflix releases all with the swipe of my finger like a classical music conductor. Afterwards, I sit back in relax mode as a daily news aggregator covers my windshield and I let whatever the view is outside go by unnoticed. To me, all of this sounds nice, but not my cup of tea: I’ll give up my car when you can pull the gearshift from my cold, dead hands.

AVs are on the horizon with the potential of becoming mandatory in several different senses. One is mandatory by popularity: designated parking areas, insurance rates, and sponsorships. Another is mandatory by law: special or restricted roadways, taxes, fines, and limits on drivers. Another is public and “shared” driving: Taxis, Uber, etc. all of which are anticipated to be driverless sometime between 2025 and 2030.

Can you really imagine a driverless world? I can, but it is also probable that the complete implementation won’t take place in my life. (I feel like guys of my generation who wanted to retire before they had to deal with computers, only to find that computers were in their retired life too and they’d have to learn smartphones, emails, tablets and Siri.) For the time being, I still get to drive with the windows down, shifting up and down (which I quite enjoy) as I come out of or go into turns, and accelerating just because I want to. I still get to see the sights out my windows in all of their glory, whether it be The City, the fog rounding its edges into subtle corners, or the soft fall light embracing a country road heading up to the wine country. I get to enjoy these “driving” moments while blasting my music and free from the interruptions of a busy schedule, appointments, and the problems that face all businesses today. Deadlines and Commitments. I just want a few more moments with a gas pedal under my foot and a good tune in my ear.

My dad loved road trips. We’d pile in the car on a weekend day, usually a Sunday and drive. He often had a destination. A relative or friend to see, a waterfall, or sometimes a road with lots of interest. Our vacations were mostly road trips, always with an end in sight but willing to zig and zag when something interesting was on the horizon. I became schooled in reading of maps, trying to tempt my parents into side trips to see various treats or fulfill my curiosity. Maps have gone by the wayside with the GPS in our cars and phones, but it’s not the same. (More about that here).

Mediasmith Morsel

Our old friend Mike Drexler talking about changes in the financial procedures necessary in our industry. 

Happy to say that Mediasmith adopted these processes some time ago. Bring it on!
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No one has come out and said it yet, but I firmly believe there will be a point where the “right” to drive a car will be called into consideration, maybe even a bigger issue than the heated debate on gun ownership. Google’s AV project lead Chris Urmson has already stated his goal is to make sure his 11-year-old son doesn’t need to get a driver’s license. That’s right, we are talking the same automobile that fueled the post WW2 American Dream, that gave us the ability to live in the ‘burbs (that quiet cul-de-sac) and commute to work, the rite of passage for every boomer teen when reaching 16, to get their license and take mom or dad’s car out for a joy ride with their friends, avoiding scrapes and tickets (most of the time) while getting those first tastes of freedom. Sadly, self-driving seems to only have a decade or two left. The freeways will go first. Regimenting more cars, closer together, kept to a single lane, following obediently-no lane changes allowed. The country roads will be the last to survive. But it’s fairly certain that by sometime mid-century, even those open roads will vanish too, along with learning how to “take it to the limit, one more time”.

An earlier article of mine, What is the timeline for Connected Cars, Driverless Cars & who owns the data?, outlines more of the specifics on how AVs are the way of the future. Tesla is achieving it through software upgrades of their current cars rather than developing an AV from scratch, and this incremental method just might work best. Apple has already discovered the difficulty of building an AV from scratch and we are likely to see the existing manufacturers partnering with tech companies to get an AV done.

From my side of the industry, what will be the biggest change will be the unintended consequence, seeing the car as a new media vehicle (pun intended), and the new media opportunities that will arise with it. What will we do with 1-4 hours added into our “leisure” time? (Another future article, stay tuned)

I’d be lying if I didn’t say that AVs entice me, I mean they are going to be-cool, convenient, and like nothing we’ve ever owned. And perhaps future generations will look at my idea of the freedom of the open road and my own “not-self-driving” car as quixotic and even selfish. But that’s okay with me. Perhaps it is best if I am left in the rearview mirror on this one.

Mediasmith Morsel

Volvo Concept 26

Gizmag explores Volvo’s Concept 26 as they reimagine the driver experience. From creative mode, to relax mode, to drive mode, this car is really cool.
Read More

The True Cost of a Super Bowl Spot

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OPINIONS. TRENDS. MEDIA ISSUES.

Welcome to Mediasmith’s influential and widely
respected newsletter

Volume 16, Issue 2

The True Cost of a Super Bowl Spot

by David Smith

(First published on MediaVillage) There’s been a lot of discussion recently on the cost of Super Bowl advertising-and every single article got it wrong. But before we tell you our perspective, here is some background: In 1967, during the first Super Bowl, the reported cost of a :30 spot was $42,000. It should be noted that $42,000 in 1967 adjusted for inflation is roughly $300,000 today. Super Bowl ads have never been cheap, but they’ve always been sought after, drawing interest early on from the likes of Master Lock, Macintosh 1984, to Budweiser and Coca-Cola. Why? Because they are generally the highest rated inventory available of the whole year. And, the Super Bowl attracts a very diverse audience, with some of the hardest to reach demographics tuning in.

This year, it was reported to cost $4.6-5MM. Which is quite an increase! In fact only 10 years ago it was in the $2MM range. That’s well over a 100% increase. The reason? There is nothing on the planet that reaches so many people at the same time: Super Bowl 50 had a 111.9MM viewers in the U.S. alone, with a 49 household rating and a 73 share across Nielsen’s 56 metered markets. Including an increase of 2.5MM unique viewers (3.96MM total) across laptops, desktops, tablets, connected TV devices and mobile phones. And these numbers still don’t accurately count viewing in public places which can be a big uplift. It is interesting that this was only the third most watched Super Bowl of all time and the peak for viewership was during the Halftime Show. This makes Pepsi’s positions slotted in half time almost ideal.

Mediasmith Morsel

The State of Video Streaming in The United States

More people than ever are using streaming platforms to watch TV and Movies. An infographic by Statista puts the Nielsen data front and center.
Read More

Let’s use this year’s :30 cost of $5MM to make the math simple. Of course there is a 15% agency commission. Which almost no media agency on the planet gets for network TV. Many get 1-2% and in their wildest dreams might get 4-5% for a network buy. So, the spot itself cost the advertiser $4.5MM with commission to the agency; the remainder was rebated to the advertiser. This year, there was an added hook: CBS would not sell a spot to someone without an additional commitment. The advertiser had to commit to an equal amount of money on CBS as their Super Bowl commitment. This does not affect most advertisers as they either bought the spot in the Upfront market with tens or hundreds of millions in additional advertising or as a part of a larger scatter buy. But for the advertiser looking for just one spot in the Super Bowl, this might have been quite a shock. So now we are talking about $9MM ($4.5MM after the rebate x2).

There are tons of articles about what you could buy with $5MM, let alone $9MM, but they miss the point. A brand can’t just spend money in one place; they need reach extension, frequency and engagement for true effectiveness. Mediasmith research suggests that in order to properly support a Super Bowl spot, you would really need to spend $15-20MM to achieve maximum effectiveness for the campaign. This includes other sports sites/videos, long-tail sports sites through programmatic, sports fan targeting through programmatic, paid and earned social, mobile, SEM and events/PR plus a good budget for collateral, in-store, etc

Keeping the above in mind, here are some other factoids supporting additional efforts:

1.Over a third of this year’s viewers used a second screen to supplement the game-viewing experience, whether checking news, commentary, sports apps, etc.

2. 52% of viewers planned to use social media while watching

3. Forbes Magazine said it best: “The advertisers who ‘win’ from the Super Bowl may not be the advertisers whose creative won the AdMeter, but rather those advertisers whose creative integration of their Super Bowl spot into a broader strategic mix drives sustainable, long-term results.”

So “if” you’re budgeting for next year, don’t think just about a spot, think about what you want to accomplish with it (reach, registering a new concept, sales, etc.) and build a plan accordingly. If you only look at advertising as the cost of a spot then you aren’t seeing the big picture. It’s like thinking you need a famous QB to win the Super Bowl when an outstanding defensive team just might do the trick. 

Mediasmith Morsel

9 Times Media Changed the Outcome of a Presidential Election

From Coolidge to Obama, ADWEEK points out how political campaigns have borrowed from the consumer marketing approach.
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What is the timeline for Connected Cars, Driverless Cars & who owns the data?

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OPINIONS. TRENDS. MEDIA ISSUES.

Welcome to Mediasmith’s influential and widely
respected newsletter

Volume 15, Issue 5

What is the timeline for Connected Cars, Driverless Cars & who owns the data?

by David Smith

New car buyers are typically concerned with things like mileage, safety features, aesthetic qualities, drivability even perhaps the immediate decrease in value their new shiny baby takes once it’s driven off the lot. The last thing they are thinking about is whether their car’s Engine Control Units and other onboard computers be compatible with future operating systems like Apple’s and Google’s; will their car’s computer allow for real-time software updates to improve the way the car operates or drives itself like Tesla’s; and who will own the user-data that their car’s computer has just started collecting? Most car owners think their car is only recording how it is performing (tire pressure, oil pressure, gas mileage, driving speeds, et cetera), and think less about their car recording things like where they go, their favorite gas station, what routes they take, and mapping a ton of sensor and road data. Even fewer are thinking about their car recording information that could raise a host of legal questions: everything from speeding, car accident liability, and seatbelt use. Did you come to a complete stop at the stop sign? Were you wearing you seatbelt? That was a school zone you just sped through. Even if you’re not sure or can’t remember, your cars knows; it’s been recording that information for some time. And that information can be accessed relatively easily. Ford Motor Company believes the data is the car owner’s property, but that view is not shared by Mercedes and BMW. In the future, this will impact who can actually work on your car, as access to the data will be necessary to do any tune-ups. And the Government hasn’t been pushed to weigh in.

The reality is that cars as manufactured today are mechanically about as advanced as they can get. They can’t go much faster (legally), can’t get from 0-60 much quicker and the level of amenities is now pretty much a function of price, not whether they can be accomplished. Technology, however, is galloping ahead. Most car owners and future car owners should be modifying their thinking relative to these progressive technologies. In addition to historical considerations, factors such as software (applications), connectivity and data need to be taken into account. If these consumers’ reasoning to not worry about this is that connected cars are still a ways off-they are mistaken. In fact, connected cars are here now, and consumer use of driverless cars is a short 4-6 years away. Since the 1970s “cars have gone from being around 99% hardware, to probably 60% hardware/ 40% software,” said Don Butler, Ford’s executive director of Connected Vehicles and Services, during a Q&A with Forbes Magazine. Ford believes that they will have a driverless car on the road by 2020. Google estimates 2021 and Tesla might be there by 2019 based on what is being said. Recently, Bloomberg BusinessWeek opined that driverless vehicles will become mandatory by 2060, with roads redesigned specifically and only for these type of vehicles (like compact car only parking or carpool lanes). Have you noticed that those parking allocations tend to be the closest spots to the store entrances and carpool lanes are 2x quicker? Driverless vehicle roadways will be the preferred pavements with benefits like a reduction in accidents resulting in death, cutting transportation times, and increasing the efficiency of driving.

Mediasmith Morsel

Data Privacy Concerns for Automotive rank as high as computers and portable devices!

While people understand data-tracking as it relates to computers and portable devices, the car’s data-tracking abilities haven’t been fully outlined.
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Tesla’s Elon Musk also believes software is the new frontier; just this week he tweeted out a casting call for software engineers. Tesla is already accessing their 90,000 cars remotely for real time updates. Just look at their new autopilot service that-thanks to machine learning algorithms-is constantly improving, along with the car’s wireless connection abilities that can load detailed mapping and sensor data automatically. If you read between the lines, Tesla will become a driverless car through a software upgrade while all other manufacturers are trying to make one from scratch. Every day, the timeline for autonomous-smart vehicles-computers on wheels-shortens like the technological singularity clock. Google has stated a plan to eliminate human driving in the next five years. The odds are now that if you drive in the Palo Alto, or Menlo Park area of the San Francisco Bay Area, you will encounter a Google self-driving car, and Apple has already created its first prototype. Automotive information firm R.L. Polk & Co. said the average age of the 247 million vehicles on U.S. road stands at an all-time high of 11.4 years. That means that quite possibly your next vehicle, or during the half-life of your next vehicle, a smart car and possibly self-driving car will be on your mind or in your garage.

We knew the paradigm shift from hardware to software in automobiles was coming. The car might be the last product that is manufactured so ubiquitously without realizing how the customer is actually using it. Sure we understand a hot rod or a minivan’s intended use, but that’s like saying smartphones are intended to be used only as phones, which I spoke to at length in my article Smartphone or the New Personal Server. We know they aren’t! You’re starting to see the car manufactures doing the same thing that cellphone developers did, using old words like car and phone to describe something that is much more than that and already do things without a driver like parallel parking, lane maintenance, and emergency breaking, which are common features on some cars today. What’s happening is that the driverless car is coming to us in increments, even from the existing car companies.

How will this affect the driving experience, insurance rates, or the driver itself? Will we all become back seat drivers? I believe driving will become more like an airplane experience. Sit back. Relax. And enjoy the “in-drive” movie. Or whatever else you want to do. In fact, the several hours we spend in the car during a commute may produce a major new media exposure vehicle in both the virtual and real sense. I’ll write more about this new media vehicle soon.

Holy Morsel

Tesla Car Takes Joy Ride Across the Country

On October 14th, Tesla Motors introduced “Autopilot,” which makes recent Model S sedans and all Model X SUVs semi-autonomous, through an over the air software update. Two days later, three people let their Model S P85D drive them across the country.
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Smartphone or the New Personal Server?

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OPINIONS. TRENDS. MEDIA ISSUES.

Welcome to Mediasmith’s influential and widely
respected newsletter

Volume 15, Issue 4

Smartphone or the New Personal Server?

by David Smith

Do you still think of your refrigerator as an icebox? Do you still refer to your car as your buggy? Hopefully not. Then why are we still calling our smartphones, which are actually used more for texting than for calling, phones? Because the words remote and server are taken and PDA is too “old-fashioned”? I mean, that’s what it is, right: a personal (rather than enterprise) server for wearables, your car, your home and a target for a multitude of Internet of Things (IoT) sensors.

In the 80’s, personal computers found their way into the marketplace. This caused IT people to lose some control of their environment. Enter Ethernet and the enterprise client/server environment, where the PCs were the clients and the servers controlled specialized services such as files, fax, email, etc. Today, computers, more powerful than the original enterprise servers, are being carried around by people in their pockets or on their wrists in the form of smartphones and smart watches. These devices are more powerful than the first supercomputer, Cray-1, the NASA computer that shot the first space shuttle into orbit, or original common server processors like R3000. These modern personal servers also aren’t waiting around anymore for calls to service from clients. Instead, the new personal servers are actively seeking them out. Anytime you enter a store, unlock the door to your house, or take a drive, your phone is searching for information to make life a little easier.

The personal server isn’t the only thing making moves in this relationship; the client ecosystem is changing as well. Clients have always been associated with your laptop or desktop, big clunky things that needed to be carried not concealed. But, today’s clients aren’t your personal computers. They are the things talking to your smartphone, talking to that little device occupying the space between your hand and forearm (and increasingly, in your purse or bag, not even needing to come out. The use of a Bluetooth earbud is just the first example of this). One only needs to look at companies like Samsung, with its SmartThings platform (that is now compatible with nearly 200 other devices) or Google’s Nest which hosts a wide variety of devices from energy conservation to home security, to understand the boundaries of the new client-server relationship and its distinction. Real soon, Google, Apple and others are expected to release the equivalent or better of the Samsung SmartThings platform.

Mediasmith Morsel

IoT Advertising Will Be The Next Frontier!

IoT advertising will be ultra-consumer-centric and will spawn the most personalized ads yet. By leveraging advertising with IoT, the industry will create a value exchange for both consumers and clients, rather than the one way interactions of more traditional forms.
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Here are a few examples to get you up to speed on where things are headed for client-servers.

Smart Homes: Have you ever come home from a long day and still had to cook dinner, do laundry, and shuffle through hundreds of channels to find something to watch on TV? Have you also come home and realized there’s nothing to eat, no detergent for the wash, and your favorite TV show isn’t recorded. What if you could have avoided all of this? That’s the power of interoperability and hub thinking for client-servers. It allows you to not only accomplish the above, but also adjust your home thermostat to save energy during the warmer hours, turn the lights on before you get home, water the lawn, order some more detergent and get more milk delivered (same day) if you are out. Samsung’s SmartThings supports third-party products including Belkin WeMo devices, TCP smart LEDs, Philips Hue color-changing bulbs, the Sonos home music system, and the Ecobee thermostat. Eventually, everything in your home will be considered a client, all powered by tiny sensors smaller than a dime.

Wearables, Health, and Security: The watch is about to make a huge comeback, both as a client and as a personal server—and you thought the choice of a 100 phones was amazing. Thousands of “watches” ranging from the utilitarian Fitbit and Sunnto to the aesthetic Apple and Samsung appropriates are hitting the market. That’s just devices for the wrist. Think of all the other things that a person wears that could double as a client, especially if it doesn’t need any human interaction or UI while being worn. The client device, Tōd, is a beacon the size of a quarter that can track the location of your child or beloved pet discreetly. ICEdot’s Crash Sensor is another client device that attaches to your bike helmet and will contact emergency personal and send GPS coordinates if an accident happens. Health will be a huge factor in personal clients, tracking everything from your blood pressure to measuring all sorts of things through perspiration, body heat, et cetera.

Mediasmith Morsel

Are (DMPs) on the verge of becoming a commodity?

A few companies like Adobe, Krux, Neustar, Oracle and Google seem to think so. But how did they hold up in the Forrester Wave report?
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Car: Speaking of something doubling as a server, what about your car doubling as a client and creating a Wi-Fi hotspot? Or monitoring all of your car’s functions through on board computers in real time?  AT&T’s new gadget called Mobley plugs into your car’s on-board diagnostics port. The next time you turn on the engine, you’ve got a hotspot. Your passengers can stream music and movies as you navigate traffic. Instead of buying a smart car for that large price tag, you can effectively turn your 1996 or later model into one. The Automatic adapter plugs into the same port as Mobley to unlock the data in your car’s onboard computer. The Automatic diagnoses engine problems, displays trip logs, and can even call for help all via your smartphone. Viper SmartStart is another client device that lets you locate and control your car from your phone, it will even give you your vehicle’s status to make sure everything is running soundly before you hit the road.  Sounds like we’re going to need the equivalent of a USB hub extender!

Retail: Perhaps, the most inevitable thing that will develop from the new client-server relationship will be the saving grace of retail stores. I have multiple presentations dealing with “the last 100 yards or how mobile will save retail” on SlideShare. With online shopping replacing store fronts at the spellbinding speed that Walmart replaced Mom & Pop shops, the urgency to get people back inside the brick and motor has become paramount. Smartshopping will do just that. Stores, using a multitude of sensors pinging off of your server will have your itemized shopping list or prior purchases generated on your phone as you enter. It will design the most efficient way to navigate the aisles, alert you to sales, make suggestions, and even recall your purchase timelines so you never run out of anything again. If there is something out of stock, a shipping prompt will be activated immediately: no more—do you work here? Did I mention there are no (or fewer) clerks? Each item will be recorded once it is placed into your smart cart and off you go; the sensors will relay your purchases to the store on your exit.

It is evident that companies and businesses are starting to reconsider the potential of these new technologies and are expecting big things from this idea of products communicating with or without us. Reportedly, $3 Billion is projected to be spent on IoT technology by 2020. Entities that were once staying away from interoperability standards have now begun running toward the benefits of the IoT. Consumer demand may actually result in iOS, Android and MS devices communicating with each other. While the consumer does not think about personal client-server relationships, marketplace attention to the concept could pay out in a huge way.

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